Puzzle 153 (Corral) [Terraces]

This is a Wednesday Corral puzzle, with a twist. The solution is composed of two loops, one contained completely inside the other. The loops do not intersect, even at a point. A number contained in both loops tells how many squares it can see inside the inner loop. A number contained in only the outer loop tells how many squares it can see inside the outer loop, ignoring the inner loop entirely.

(Think of the loops as cliffs and the clues as people. People inside both loops are at the lowest elevation and can only see what’s down there. People inside one loop are at the middle elevation and can see anything except for what’s at the highest elevation, namely the squares outside both loops.)

Puzzle 153

Puzzle 153

All of the types and variations I’ve posted have either been developed by nikoli or myself until now. The idea for this variation was actually given to me awhile ago by reader Alan Curry, and I thought it was definitely worth trying. Probably mostly due to size, this one is solved in a rather peculiar fashion. When I post another of these it will probably be bigger.

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5 Responses to “Puzzle 153 (Corral) [Terraces]”

  1. TheSubro Says:

    I am either the dumbest reader of this blog – which is conceivable, or I am the only one innocent and willing enough to say that the Emperor is not making any sense (or both). I cannot figure out for the life of me what the rules of this puzzle variant are.

    Ken

  2. Alan Curry Says:

    First make sure you’ve done a standard Corral so you know how that works. Now picture a Corral puzzle with a smaller Corral puzzle inside of it. There are 2 loops. The big loop contains the small loop. Inside the small loop, the numbers are based on the distance to the edge of the small loop. Outside of the small loop, the numbers are based on the distance to the edge of the big loop. If you threw away the small loop and all the numbers inside of it, the remaining numbers would be valid clues for a standard Corral with the big loop being a solution. If you threw away all the other numbers, keeping only the ones inside the small loop, they would be valid clues for a standard Corral with the small loop being a solution. But only by considering them both simultaneously, with the rule that the loops aren’t allowed to touch, does the solution become unique. It could probably use a sample with some arrows for clarity…

  3. Alan Curry Says:

    So I made an example puzzle, since I’m responsible for dreaming up these crazy rules. (MM, if you can do a better presentation of these images, go ahead. Until then, everybody can look at my originals)

    ftp://kosh.dhis.org/for-mellowmelon/corralterraceexample_p.png
    ftp://kosh.dhis.org/for-mellowmelon/corralterraceexample_s.png

  4. TheSubro Says:

    Alright. First things first, thanks for the extra response Alan.
    I always suspected what the rules were but they made no sense as written. Also, after seeing my suspicions confirmed by the examples, it was a very enjoyable puzzle. Well conceived (AC), and well-executed (MM).

    I would work on the rules though, and employ an example. Maybe try:
    “The solution is composed of two loops made of lines drawn along the cell borders, one contained completely inside the other. The loops form two sections – an innermost section, and an outer or exterior section. There will usually be cells outside the outer loop as well. The loops do not intersect each other or themselves, even at a point. A number contained inside the innermost section tells how many cells it can see inside that innermost section (and it cannot see other cells in that section if blocked by a cell from the outer section). A number contained inside only the outer loop tells how many squares it can see inside the outer section as well as the inner section (an it cannot see other cells if blocked by cells outside the outer loop).”

    Well conceived (AC), and well-executed (MM). Thanks to both of you.

    Ken

  5. rob Says:

    Just to note that this was a fun puzzle — I’d love to try a larger one.

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